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http://www.maplesoft.com/applications/view.aspx?SID=5083&view=html&L=F

Error, (in hanoi) cannot determine if this expression is true or false: 0 < n

N:=n:moves:=[];
hanoi:=proc(N,source,dest,aux) global moves;
if N>0 then
hanoi(N-1,source,aux,dest):
moves:=[moves[],[N,source,dest]]:
hanoi(N-1,aux,dest,source);
end if:
end proc:
sol:=hanoi(n,1,3,2);

We find recent applications of the components applied to the linear momentum, circular equations applied to engineering. Just simply replace the vector or scalar fields to thereby reasoning and use the right button.

 

Momento_Lineal_y_Circular.mw

(in spanish)

Atte.

L.AraujoC.

Here we have an application to understand how algebraic expressions, calculating degrees relative abosulutos polynomial operations and introduction to work.Here we have an application to understand how algebraic expressions, calculating degrees relative abosulutos polynomial operations and introduction to work.

 

Grados_de_Polinomios.mw

(in spanish)

Atte.

L.AraujoC.

 

 

In case anyone is interested, we recently posted a new application on the Application Center,

Time Series Analysis: Forecasting Average Global Temperatures

While interesting in itself (well, I think so, anyway), this application also provides tips and techniques for analyzing time series data in Maple, and shows how to access online data sets through the new data sets functionality in Maple 2015.

eithne

With this application we can meet safety characteristics of a relationship and simple or compound functions. Made with maple 2015.

Relaciones_y_Funciones.mw

(in spanish)

L.AraujoC.

I'd like to pay attention to an application "Interaural Time Delay" by Samir Khan. His applications are interesting, based on  real data, and  mathematically accurate. Here is its introduction:

"Humans locate the origin of a sound with several cues. One technique employs the small difference in the time taken for the sound to reach either ear; this is known as the interaural time delay (ITD). This application modifies a single-channel audio file so that the sound appears to originate at an angle from the observer. It does this by introducing an extra channel of sound. Despite both channels having the same amplitude, the sound appears to come from an angle simply by delaying one channel".

Another application for the study of rational numbers in operations, generating fraction, etc.

 

Numeros_Racionales.mw

(in spanish)

 

Atte.

L.AraujoC.

In this work we show you what to do with the programming of Embedded Components applied to graphics in the Cartesian plane; from the visualization of a point up to three-dimensional objects and also using the Maple language generare own interactive applications for touch screen technology in mobile devices techniques. Given that computers use multicore and designed algorithms that solve calculus problems with very good performance in time; this brings programming to more complex mathematical structures such as in the linear algebra, analytic geometry and advanced methods in numerical analysis. The graphics will show real-time results for the correct use of the parallel programming undertook to bear the procedural technique is well suited to the data structure, curves and surfaces. Interaction in a single graphical container allowing the teaching and / or research the rapid change of parameters; giving a quick interpretation of the results.

 

FAST_UNT_2015.pdf

Programming_Embedded_Components_for_Graphics_in_Maple.mw

Atte.

L.Araujo C.

Physics Pure

Computer Science

 

 

 

Ever year about this time, somewhat geeky holiday-themed content makes the rounds on the internet.  And I realized that even though I have seen much of this content already, I still enjoy seeing it again. (Why wouldn’t I want to see a Dalek Christmas tree every year?)

So in the spirit of internet recycling, here are a couple of older-but-still-fun Maple applications with a Christmas/holiday theme for your enjoyment.

Talkin’ Turkey

The Physics of Santa Claus

Other examples (old or new) are most welcome, if anyone wants to share.

eithne

We received an interesting and timely submission to the Maple Application Center this morning that I think people might be interested in.  It's called:

The Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, Rosetta & Philae, by Dr. Ahmed Baroudy. From the abstract:

Our plan is rather a modest one since all we want is to get , by calculations, specific data concerning the comet and its lander.
We shall take a simplified model and consider the comet as a perfect solid sphere to which we can apply Newton's laws.

We want to find:

I- the acceleration on the comet surface ,
II- its radius,
III- its density,
IV- the velocity of Philae just after the 1st bounce off the comet (it has bounced twice),
V- the time for Philae to reach altitude of 1000 m above the comet .

We shall compare our findings with the already known data to see how close our simplified mathematical model findings are to the duck-shaped comet already known results.
It turned out that our calculations for a sphere shaped comet are very close to the already known data.

Click on the link above if you want to take a look.

 

eithne

This application calculates the number of photons reaching a camera sensor for a given exposure. A blackbody model of the sun is generated. The "Sunny 16" rule for exposure is demonstrated. Calculations are done using units.Photon_Exposure_Array.mw

Photon ExposureNULLNULL

Blackbody Model of the Sun

    h := Units:-Standard:-`*`(Units:-Standard:-`*`(0.6626069e-33, Units:-Standard:-`^`(Unit('m'), 2)), Units:-Standard:-`*`(Unit('kg'), Units:-Standard:-`/`(Unit('s')))): 

Plank Constant       

  kb := Units:-Standard:-`*`(Units:-Standard:-`*`(0.1380650e-22, Units:-Standard:-`*`(Units:-Standard:-`^`(Unit('m'), 2), Units:-Standard:-`/`(Units:-Standard:-`^`(Unit('s'), 2)))), Units:-Standard:-`*`(Unit('kg'), Units:-Standard:-`/`(Unit('K')))): 

Boltzman Constant  

c := Units:-Standard:-`*`(0.2997925e9, Units:-Standard:-`*`(Unit('m'), Units:-Standard:-`/`(Unit('s')))):  ``

Light Speed

Rsun := Units:-Standard:-`*`(Units:-Standard:-`*`(6.955, Units:-Standard:-`^`(10, 8)), Unit('m')): ``

Sun Radius  

Re_orb := Units:-Standard:-`*`(Units:-Standard:-`*`(1.496, Units:-Standard:-`^`(10, 11)), Unit('m')): ``

Earth Orbit

Tsun := Units:-Standard:-`*`(5800, Unit('K')): ``

Sun Color Temperature     

 tf_atm := .718: 

Transmission Factor  

 

Sun: Spectral Radiant Exitance to Earth: Spectral Irradiance                   

  "M(lambda):=(2*Pi*h*c^(2))/((lambda)^(5))*1/((e)^((h*c)/(lambda*kb*Tsun))-1)*(Rsun/(Re_orb))^(2)*tf_atm:" NULL

evalf(M(Units:-Standard:-`*`(555, Unit('nm')))) = 1277414308.*Units:-Unit(('kg')/(('m')*('s')^3))"(->)"1.277414308*Units:-Unit(('W')/(('nm')*('m')^2))NULL

Photopic Relative Response VP vs λ

 

csvFile := FileTools[Filename]("/VPhotopic.csv")NULL = "VPhotopic.csv"NULL

VPdata := ImportMatrix(csvFile) = Vector(4, {(1) = ` 471 x 2 `*Matrix, (2) = `Data Type: `*float[8], (3) = `Storage: `*rectangular, (4) = `Order: `*Fortran_order})NULLNULL

 

`&lambda;P` := [seq(1 .. 4000)]:

VP := ArrayInterpolation(VPdata, `&lambda;P`):             (ArrayInterpolation for x,y data VPdata returns y' for new x data lambdaP)

NULLVParray := [`$`([`&lambda;P`[n], VP[n]], n = 1 .. 4000)]:                     

Mearth := [`$`([n, Units:-Standard:-`*`(Units:-Standard:-`*`(M(Units:-Standard:-`*`(n, Unit('nm'))), Unit('nm')), Units:-Standard:-`*`(Units:-Standard:-`^`(Unit('s'), 3), Units:-Standard:-`/`(Unit('kg'))))], n = 1 .. 4000)]:````

``

dualaxisplot(plot([Mearth], lambda = 300 .. 900, style = line, color = [blue], labels = ["&lambda; (nm)", "M (W/nm m^2)"], title = "Spectral Radiant Exitance of the Sun", titlefont = ["ARIAL", 15], legend = [Exitance], size = [800, 300]), plot([VParray], style = line, color = [green], labels = ["&lambda; (nm)", "Relative Response"], legend = [Units:-Standard:-`*`(Units:-Standard:-`*`(Photopic, Relative), Response)]))

 

``

 

 

 

Illuminance in Radiometric and Photometric Units:

E__r := sum(Units:-Standard:-`*`(M(Units:-Standard:-`*`(lambda, Unit('nm'))), Unit('nm')), lambda = 200 .. 4000) = 984.7275549*Units:-Unit(('kg')/('s')^3)"(->)"984.7275549*Units:-Unit(('W')/('m')^2)NULL

NULL

E__po := Units:-Standard:-`*`(Units:-Standard:-`*`(683.002, Units:-Standard:-`*`(Unit('lm'), Units:-Standard:-`/`(Unit('W')))), sum(Units:-Standard:-`*`(Units:-Standard:-`*`(VP[lambda], M(Units:-Standard:-`*`(lambda, Unit('nm')))), Unit('nm')), lambda = 200 .. 4000)) = HFloat(91873.47376063903)*Units:-Unit('lx')NULL

Translation from Illuminance to Luminance for Reflected Light;

 

Object Reflectance          R__o:      

Object Luminance           L__po := proc (R__o) options operator, arrow; R__o*E__po/(Pi*Unit('sr')) end proc:                evalf(L__po(1)) = HFloat(29244.234968360346)*Units:-Unit(('cd')/('m')^2) 

 

Illuminance of a Camera Sensor  Eps applied for time texp determines Luminous Exposure Hp;

Ideal Illuminance is determined by the exposure time texp, effective f-number N and to a less extent the angle to the optical axis θ;

 

• 

H       Luminous Exposure

• 

Eps     Illuminance to the Camera

• 

N                                               Effective F-Number

• 

texp             Exposure Time

• 

θ        Angle to the Optical Axis    

 

E__ps_ideal = Units:-Standard:-`*`(Units:-Standard:-`*`(Units:-Standard:-`*`(Pi, Units:-Standard:-`/`(4)), L__po), Units:-Standard:-`*`(Units:-Standard:-`^`(cos(theta), 4), Units:-Standard:-`/`(Units:-Standard:-`^`(N, 2)))):

H__p_ideal = Units:-Standard:-`*`(E__ps_ideal, t__exp):

 

The camera meter determines the exposure time texp to balance the object luminance, reflectance and effective f-number. It does this based on an internal constant k and the camera ISO s.

• 

s        ISO Gain (Based on saturation at 3 stops above the average scene luminance)

• 

k       Reflected Light Meter Calibration Constant      k__m := Units:-Standard:-`*`(Units:-Standard:-`*`(12.5, Unit('lx')), Unit('s')):  

                                                                                                  for Nikon, Canon and Sekonic

• 

c        Incident Light Meter Calibration Constant       c__m := Units:-Standard:-`*`(Units:-Standard:-`*`(250, Unit('lx')), Unit('s')):        

                                                                                                  for Sekonic with flat domeNULL

N^2/t__exp = `#mrow(mi("\`E__po\`"),mo("&sdot;"),mi("s"))`/c__m                        (Incident Light Meter)  NULL 

Units:-Standard:-`*`(Units:-Standard:-`^`(N, 2), Units:-Standard:-`/`(t__exp)) = Units:-Standard:-`*`(`#mrow(mi("\`L__po\`"),mo("&sdot;"),mi("s"))`, Units:-Standard:-`/`(k__m)):                        (Reflected Light Meter)

NULL

Solve for H in terms of the Camera Meter Constant k and s

 

Es = Units:-Standard:-`*`(Units:-Standard:-`*`(Units:-Standard:-`*`(Pi, Units:-Standard:-`/`(4)), Lo), Units:-Standard:-`*`(Units:-Standard:-`^`(cos(theta), 4), Units:-Standard:-`/`(Units:-Standard:-`^`(N, 2)))): NULL

t = Units:-Standard:-`*`(Units:-Standard:-`*`(km, Units:-Standard:-`^`(N, 2)), Units:-Standard:-`/`(Units:-Standard:-`*`(Lo, s))):NULL

NULL

NULL

H = Es*t

H = Units:-Standard:-`*`(Units:-Standard:-`*`(Units:-Standard:-`*`(Units:-Standard:-`*`(Pi, Units:-Standard:-`/`(4)), Lo), Units:-Standard:-`*`(Units:-Standard:-`^`(cos(theta), 4), Units:-Standard:-`/`(Units:-Standard:-`^`(N, 2)))), Units:-Standard:-`*`(Units:-Standard:-`*`(km, Units:-Standard:-`^`(N, 2)), Units:-Standard:-`/`(Units:-Standard:-`*`(Lo, s))))"(=)"H = (1/4)*Pi*cos(theta)^4*km/sNULLNULL

 t = H/Es

t = Units:-Standard:-`*`(Units:-Standard:-`*`(Units:-Standard:-`*`(Pi, Units:-Standard:-`/`(4)), Units:-Standard:-`*`(Units:-Standard:-`*`(Units:-Standard:-`^`(cos(theta), 4), km), Units:-Standard:-`/`(s))), Units:-Standard:-`/`(Units:-Standard:-`*`(Units:-Standard:-`*`(Units:-Standard:-`*`(Pi, Units:-Standard:-`/`(4)), Lo), Units:-Standard:-`*`(Units:-Standard:-`^`(cos(theta), 4), Units:-Standard:-`/`(Units:-Standard:-`^`(N, 2))))))"(=)"t = km*N^2/(Lo*s)NULLNULL

H__p := proc (s, theta) options operator, arrow; (1/4)*Pi*k__m*cos(theta)^4/s end proc:                                              

  evalf(H__p(100, 0)) = 0.9817477044e-1*Units:-Unit(('cd')*('s')/('m')('radius')^2)"(->)"0.9817477044e-1*Units:-Unit(('lx')*('s'))NULL

 

Note:  Meters are typically set for a scene reflectance 3 stops below 100% or 12.5%.

           

  E__ps := proc (N, R__o, theta) options operator, arrow; (1/4)*Pi*Unit('sr')*R__o*E__po*cos(theta)^4/(Pi*Unit('sr')*N^2) end proc:               

 evalf(E__ps(16, Units:-Standard:-`/`(Units:-Standard:-`^`(2, 3)), 0)) = HFloat(11.215023652421756)*Units:-Unit('lx')                                                                                                   

t__exp_ideal := proc (N, s, R__o) options operator, arrow; H__p(s, theta)/E__ps(N, R__o, theta) end proc:                                     

  evalf(t__exp_ideal(16, 100, Units:-Standard:-`/`(Units:-Standard:-`^`(2, 3)))) = HFloat(0.008753862094289947)*Units:-Unit('s') NULL NULL

 

 

Actual exposure time includes typical lens losses;

 m := Units:-Standard:-`/`(80):``

Magnification  

  T := .9:``

Lens Transmittance

 F := 1.03:``

Lens Flare

V := 1: ``

Vignetting

 

                                                  ``

Total Lens Efficiency

q := Units:-Standard:-`*`(Units:-Standard:-`*`(Units:-Standard:-`*`(T, F), V), Units:-Standard:-`^`(Units:-Standard:-`+`(1, Units:-Standard:-`-`(m)), 2)):                                      evalf(q) = .9039698438NULL

 

Replacing Eps with q*Eps we get the "Sunny 16" relation between exposure time and ISO;  NULL

t__exp := proc (N, s, R__o) options operator, arrow; H__p(s, theta)/(q*E__ps(N, R__o, theta)) end proc:NULL               evalf(t__exp(16, 100, Units:-Standard:-`/`(Units:-Standard:-`^`(2, 3)))) = HFloat(0.009683798806264942)*Units:-Unit('s')NULL

t__exp_alt := proc (N, s, R__o) options operator, arrow; k__m*N^2*Pi/(s*q*R__o*E__po) end proc:                  evalf(t__exp_alt(16, 100, Units:-Standard:-`/`(Units:-Standard:-`^`(2, 3)))) = HFloat(0.00968379880412244)*Units:-Unit('s') 

• 

The Number of Photons NP Reaching the Sensor Area A;

• 

Circle of confusion for 24x36mm "Full Frame" for 1 arcminute view at twice the diagonal:

                          A__cc := Units:-Standard:-`*`(Units:-Standard:-`*`(Pi, Units:-Standard:-`^`(Units:-Standard:-`*`(12.6, Unit('`&mu;m`')), 2)), Units:-Standard:-`/`(4)):    

     

• 

  Sensor Bandwidth                                          Photopic Response VP

• 

  Exposure Time for Zone 5: Rscene=12.5% , Saturation in Zone 8 Rscene=100%

• 

  Camera ISO differs from Saturation ISO. Typical Saturation ISO is 2300 when the camera is set to 3200. See DxoMark.

 

NULL

The average number of photons for exposure time based on Reflectance of the scene  relative to the metered value:    

Zone 5;   R__meter := R__scene: 

NP := proc (s, R__o, theta) options operator, arrow; (1/4)*t__exp(N, s, R__meter)*A__cc*q*R__scene*cos(theta)^4*(sum(VP[lambda]*M(lambda*Unit('nm'))*Unit('nm')*lambda*Unit('nm')/(h*c), lambda = 200 .. 4000))/N^2 end proc: 

                                                                               evalf(NP(2300, 1, Units:-Standard:-`*`(0, Unit('deg')))) = HFloat(2191.5645712603696)  NULL

Zone 8;       R__meter := Units:-Standard:-`*`(R__scene, Units:-Standard:-`/`(Units:-Standard:-`^`(2, 3))):   NULL

NP__sat := proc (s, theta) options operator, arrow; (1/4)*t__exp(N, s, R__meter)*A__cc*q*R__scene*cos(theta)^4*(sum(VP[lambda]*M(lambda*Unit('nm'))*Unit('nm')*lambda*Unit('nm')/(h*c), lambda = 200 .. 4000))/N^2 end proc:  NULL

                                                                              evalf(NP__sat(2300, Units:-Standard:-`*`(0, Unit('deg')))) = HFloat(17532.516570082957)NULL

NULL

 

Approximate Formula

 

H__sat := proc (s__sat) options operator, arrow; H__p(s__sat, 0)*E__ps(N, 1, 0)/E__ps(N, 1/8, 0) end proc:      

                                                                                       evalf(H__sat(s__sat)) = HFloat(78.53981635)*Units:-Unit(('cd')*('s')/('m')('radius')^2)/s__satNULLNULL

Average Visible Photon Energy

P__e_ave := Units:-Standard:-`*`(Units:-Standard:-`/`(Units:-Standard:-`+`(850, -350)), sum(Units:-Standard:-`*`(Units:-Standard:-`*`(h, c), Units:-Standard:-`/`(Units:-Standard:-`*`(lambda, Unit('nm')))), lambda = 350 .. 850)):                    evalf(P__e_ave) = 0.3533174192e-18*Units:-Unit('J') 

NPtyp := proc (s__sat) options operator, arrow; H__sat(s__sat)*A__cc/(683.002*(Unit('lm')/Unit('W'))*P__e_ave) end proc: 

                               evalf(NPtyp(2300)) = HFloat(17644.363333654386)"(->)"HFloat(17644.363333654386)NULL

NULL

 

Download Photon_Exposure_Array.mw

This is an application of vector position to better understand the vector speed and acceleration is a well defined vector space. Fully developed with embedded components for proper use.

 

    Vector_Posición.mw                   (in spanish)

 

L. Araujo C.

Physics Pure

Computer Science

This application creates DNG matrices by optimizing Delta E from a raw photo of x-rites color checker. The color temperature for the photograph is also estimated.  Inputs are raw data from RawDigger and generic camera color response from DXO Mark.

Initialization

   

NULL

NULL

NULL

NULL

NULL

XYZoptical to RGB to XYZdata

 

 

Sr,g,b is the relative spectral transmittance of the filter array not selectivity for XY or Z of a given color.

Pulling Sr,g,b out of the integral assumes they are scalars. For example Sr attenuates X, Y and Z by the same amount.

Raw Balance is not White Point Adaptation.

The transmission loss of Red and Blue pixels relative to green is compensated by D=inverse(S). The relation to incident chromaticity, xy is unchanged as S.D=1.

(See Bruce Lindbloom; "Spectrum to XYZ" and "RGB/XYZ Matrices" also, Marcel Patek; "Transformation of RGB Primaries")

 

 

X = (Int(I*xbar*S, lambda))/N:

Y = (Int(I*ybar*S, lambda))/N:

Z = (Int(I*zbar*S, lambda))/N:

N = Int(I*ybar, lambda):

• 

XYZ to RGB

(Vector(3, {(1) = R_Tbb, (2) = G_Tbb, (3) = B_Tbb})) = (Matrix(3, 3, {(1, 1) = XR*Sr, (1, 2) = YR*Sr, (1, 3) = ZR*Sr, (2, 1) = XG*Sg, (2, 2) = YG*Sg, (2, 3) = ZG*Sg, (3, 1) = XB*Sb, (3, 2) = YB*Sb, (3, 3) = ZB*Sb})).(Vector(3, {(1) = X_Tbb, (2) = Y_Tbb, (3) = Z_Tbb}))

NULL

(Vector(3, {(1) = R_Tbb, (2) = G_Tbb, (3) = B_Tbb})) = (Matrix(3, 3, {(1, 1) = Sr, (1, 2) = 0, (1, 3) = 0, (2, 1) = 0, (2, 2) = Sg, (2, 3) = 0, (3, 1) = 0, (3, 2) = 0, (3, 3) = Sb})).(Matrix(3, 3, {(1, 1) = XR, (1, 2) = YR, (1, 3) = ZR, (2, 1) = XG, (2, 2) = YG, (2, 3) = ZG, (3, 1) = XB, (3, 2) = YB, (3, 3) = ZB})).(Vector(3, {(1) = X_Tbb, (2) = Y_Tbb, (3) = Z_Tbb}))

 

Camera_Neutral = (Matrix(3, 3, {(1, 1) = Sr, (1, 2) = 0, (1, 3) = 0, (2, 1) = 0, (2, 2) = Sg, (2, 3) = 0, (3, 1) = 0, (3, 2) = 0, (3, 3) = Sb})).(Matrix(3, 3, {(1, 1) = XR, (1, 2) = YR, (1, 3) = ZR, (2, 1) = XG, (2, 2) = YG, (2, 3) = ZG, (3, 1) = XB, (3, 2) = YB, (3, 3) = ZB})).(Vector(3, {(1) = X_wht, (2) = Y_wht, (3) = Z_wht}))

NULL

NULL

NULL

• 

RGB to XYZ (The extra step of adaptation to D50 is included below)

 

(Vector(3, {(1) = X_D50, (2) = Y_D50, (3) = Z_D50})) = (Matrix(3, 3, {(1, 1) = XTbbtoXD50, (1, 2) = YTbbtoXD50, (1, 3) = ZTbbtoXD50, (2, 1) = XTbbtoYD50, (2, 2) = YTbbtoYD50, (2, 3) = ZTbbtoYD50, (3, 1) = XTbbtoZD50, (3, 2) = YTbbtoZD50, (3, 3) = ZTbbtoZD50})).(Matrix(3, 3, {(1, 1) = RX*Dr, (1, 2) = GX*Dg, (1, 3) = BX*Db, (2, 1) = RY*Dr, (2, 2) = GY*Dg, (2, 3) = BY*Db, (3, 1) = RZ*Dr, (3, 2) = GZ*Dg, (3, 3) = BZ*Db})).(Vector(3, {(1) = R_Tbb, (2) = G_Tbb, (3) = B_Tbb})) NULL

NULL

(Vector(3, {(1) = X_D50, (2) = Y_D50, (3) = Z_D50})) = (Matrix(3, 3, {(1, 1) = XTbbtoXD50, (1, 2) = YTbbtoXD50, (1, 3) = ZTbbtoXD50, (2, 1) = XTbbtoYD50, (2, 2) = YTbbtoYD50, (2, 3) = ZTbbtoYD50, (3, 1) = XTbbtoZD50, (3, 2) = YTbbtoZD50, (3, 3) = ZTbbtoZD50})).(Matrix(3, 3, {(1, 1) = RX, (1, 2) = GX, (1, 3) = BX, (2, 1) = RY, (2, 2) = GY, (2, 3) = BY, (3, 1) = RZ, (3, 2) = GZ, (3, 3) = BZ})).(Matrix(3, 3, {(1, 1) = Dr, (1, 2) = 0, (1, 3) = 0, (2, 1) = 0, (2, 2) = Dg, (2, 3) = 0, (3, 1) = 0, (3, 2) = 0, (3, 3) = Db})).(Vector(3, {(1) = R_Tbb, (2) = G_Tbb, (3) = B_Tbb}))

NULL

(Vector(3, {(1) = X_D50, (2) = Y_D50, (3) = Z_D50})) = (Matrix(3, 3, {(1, 1) = RX_D50, (1, 2) = GX_D50, (1, 3) = BX_D50, (2, 1) = RY_D50, (2, 2) = GY_D50, (2, 3) = BY_D50, (3, 1) = RZ_D50, (3, 2) = GZ_D50, (3, 3) = BZ_D50})).(Matrix(3, 3, {(1, 1) = Dr, (1, 2) = 0, (1, 3) = 0, (2, 1) = 0, (2, 2) = Dg, (2, 3) = 0, (3, 1) = 0, (3, 2) = 0, (3, 3) = Db})).(Vector(3, {(1) = R_Tbb, (2) = G_Tbb, (3) = B_Tbb}))

NULL

(Vector(3, {(1) = X_D50wht, (2) = Y_D50wht, (3) = Z_D50wht})) = (Matrix(3, 3, {(1, 1) = RX_D50, (1, 2) = GX_D50, (1, 3) = BX_D50, (2, 1) = RY_D50, (2, 2) = GY_D50, (2, 3) = BY_D50, (3, 1) = RZ_D50, (3, 2) = GZ_D50, (3, 3) = BZ_D50})).(Matrix(3, 3, {(1, 1) = Dr, (1, 2) = 0, (1, 3) = 0, (2, 1) = 0, (2, 2) = Dg, (2, 3) = 0, (3, 1) = 0, (3, 2) = 0, (3, 3) = Db})).Camera_Neutral

NULL

Functions

   

NULL

Input Data

   

NULL

Solve for Camera to XYZ D50 and T

   

NULL


Download Camera_to_XYZ_Tcorr.mw

 

Maplesoft regularly hosts live webinars on a variety of topics. Below you will find details on an upcoming webinar we think may be of interest to the MaplePrimes community.  For the complete list of upcoming webinars, visit our website.

Hollywood Math 2

In this second installment of the Hollywood Math webinar series, we will present some more examples of mathematics being used in Hollywood films and popular hit TV series. For instance, have you wondered how Ben Campbell solved his professor’s challenge so easily in the movie “21”? Or about the details of the Nash equilibrium that John Nash first developed in a “A Beautiful Mind”? We’ve got the answers! These relevant, and exciting examples can be used as material to engage your students with examples familiar to them, or you can just attend the webinar for its entertainment value.

Anyone with an interest in mathematics, especially high school and early college math educators, will be both entertained and informed by attending this webinar. At the end of the webinar you’ll be given an opportunity to download an application containing all of the examples that we demonstrate.

To join us for the live presentation, please click here to register.

If you missed the first webinar in this two part series, you can view the 'Hollywood Math' recording on our website.

Maple WWW - Maple Worksheets in the World Wide Web

DigiArea Team is proud to present new modern web technology for Maple Worksheets - Maple WWW. 

Maple WWW is a technology that brings Maple Worksheets to the World Wide Web. The technology provides a web application to view and share interactive scientific documents across the web. Maple WWW allows to open Maple worksheets in your browser without any additional plugins or extensions.

You can read more about the technology here:
http://digi-area.com/light/MapleWWW/

You can see the technology in action right here using the following embedded Maple Worksheet!

 

 

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