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I have a function when expressed in polar coordinates such that a trig function resides inside a trig function.  In calculus 101 we all learned that integrating the product or quotient of 2 or more trig functions requires integration by parts but I have never run across the case where a trig function is a function of another trig function.  Any one have any references I should consult on to learn how to handle this?

Let be q(x) some polynomial of degree = 2 in several, n variables x[i],
x to be thought as (row) vector

Can Maple provide the quadratic normalform for q (real resp. complex)?

By this it is meant that q ° f (x) equals one of

  Sum( c[i]*x[i], i=1..n)
  Sum( c[i]*x[i], i=1..n) + 1
  Sum( c[i]*x[i], i=1..n) + x[n+1]

where c[i] in K, K = Reals or Complex (should not matter so much, except
char(K), and square roots have to exist, so Rationals(squareRoots) is fine),
and f: K^n -> K^n is affine ( = bijective and linear + shift vector)?

My calculus book says that y = (x^2 - 2)/(x - sqrt(2)) is discontinuous at 2, but Maple finds a limit of

 

My calculus text says that a function cannot have an ordinary limit at an endpoint of its domain, but it can have a one-sided limit.  So, in the case of f(x) = sqrt(4 - x^2), the text says (a) that it has a left-hand limit at x = 2 and a right-hand limit at x = -2, but it does not have a left-hand limit at x = -2 or a right-hand limit at x = 2 and (b) that it does not have ordinary two-sided limits at either -2 or 2.

So there are six possibilities.  Maple gives limit = 0 for all six.  Why the discrepancy?

Alla

hi, i'm using an existing Maple mws that was created by some unknow version of Maple. the Maple text is show below, and the old result is the last line (0.28031703) restart; T := ->(1/8)*sqrt(x^2+225)+(1/3)*sqrt((20-x)^2+625); dT := D(T); solve(dT(x) = 0, x); evalf(%); Sols := %; Xbest := Sols[1]; solve(25/(20-x) = 15./x, x); T(%)-T(Xbest) 0.28031703 when i run in with Maple 12 Student Edition, the result I get is 11.41326364-(1/8)*sqrt(13.51659367[1]^2+225)-(1/3)*sqrt(1025-40*13.51659367[1]+13.51659367[1]^2)

Good morning.

 

I've this funny problem with maple11. I get an expression as output from a calculus, and I try to simplify it with simplify(%), but simplify don't simplify and give the same expression as result.

On the other hand, If I copy the expression and paste it as argument of simplify it work fine.

Anyone know why this happens?

 

Thank you

S.

ps: the expression to simplify (in fact is more simple than a simplification: there are terms equals but with different sign to cancel togheter) is

 

Any tips on how to solve fixed endpoint problems in the calculus of variations?

For instance,

Find the extremal for:

int(diff(x(t),t)^2/(t^3),t=1..2) with x(1)=2 and x(2)=17.

The correct answer is x(t) = t^4 + 1.

How can Maple arrive at the following, for an unspecified function f(x,y), without knowing sufficient conditions (eg. whether the 2nd partials are continuous)?

> # From the ?diff help-page
> diff(f(x,y),x,y) - diff(f(x,y),y,x);
                                      0

Continuity of integrands isn't generally assumed by int (there's a separate optional parameter which enables it...

Okay, I'm just really starting to get into Maple again, but I'm having a little trouble getting a package to work.

I'm trying to take a look and review the precalculus package from the application center but it doesn't seem to work. 

It's from maple 7.  The new version doesn't seem to follow through on the commands made.

No, the title does not come from hornybitches.com, nor does it mean something related to sex.

Special Relativity has been around for ~100 years, General Relativity for ~90 years.  I'm hoping that with the assistance of Maple and Mapleprimes I may be able to do some tensor calculus to better understand Einstein.  Perhaps the twin paradox is within my reach.  Perhaps even the orbit of Mercury.

I need to find an example of a function of one variable that has an antiderivative that can be expressed very simply in terms of fuctions that a 1st-year calculus student would know, but int (command name in maple) can't find an antiderivative.

Hint: Start with the antiderivative F(x), and get f(x) by differentiating it and simplifying. You might try something involving a few square roots and logarithms or exponentials or trigonometric functions.

I need to find an example of a function of one variable that has an antiderivative that can be expressed very simply in terms of fuctions that a 1st-year calculus student would know, but int (command name in maple) can't find an antiderivative.

Hint: Start with the antiderivative F(x), and get f(x) by differentiating it and simplifying. You might try something involving a few square roots and logarithms or exponentials or trigonometric functions.

I need to find an example of a function of one variable that has an antiderivative that can be expressed very simply in terms of fuctions that a 1st-year calculus student would know, but int (command name in maple) can't find an antiderivative.

Hint: Start with the antiderivative F(x), and get f(x) by differentiating it and simplifying. You might try something involving a few square roots and logarithms or exponentials or trigonometric functions.

We are pleased to announce the winners of the Great Application Contest. First prize is awarded to Dr. Jason Schattman, for his entry Can a Square Roll?, an exploration of the "Renaissance Man of calculus problems", the square wheel problem. The runner-up is Prof. Mario Lemelin, for his Pré-test en Mathématique, a Maple-based questionnaire that lets beginning differential calculus students test their secondary school mathematics comprehension. These and many other Maple applications can of course be viewed on the Maple Application Center. Congratulations to both!

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