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I would like to pay attention to http://www.ams.org/samplings/feature-column/fc-2013-05 .
Comparing the Galileo's calculation 87654/53 with the capacity of Maple, the question arises:
"Are we  cleverer than Galileo Galilei?". I don't know the answer.

A set of three taped video interviews with famous physicist and mathematician Cornelius Lanczos (1893-1974) has been made available online by the University of Manchester.

Can someone explain to me how I flush the memory build up that occurs as Maple keeps track of historical execution?

If I, for example, write a FOR loop that iterates a huge amount of times and don't include the colon after "end do", but rather use the semicolon, the memory usage keeps creeping up and then finally Maple just goes off into never land and never comes back.

I tried this in Windows and Mac OS X.  Same results.

I thought I could add an interface(historysize=?...

Back when I was working at the University of Waterloo, I found several copies of a VHS tape sitting on a dusty bookshelf full of old Maple boxes and manuals. The tape's cover had a line drawing of Issac Newton on it and the title "Maple V: The Future of Mathematics".

There was...

One of the best things about growing up in the “Hood” is that it feels really good when you leave. I grew up in a neighborhood called Downsview in Toronto whose claim to fame used to be it was the home to the DeHavilland Aircraft company but today is more associated with ongoing issues of crime, poverty, and many other urban illnesses. So every time I hear that someone from the Hood did something great, I take notice and I take special pride. This is the story about...

The term “from months to days” is a favorite slogan of mine and I have relied on it religiously for over two decades to illustrate the fundamental benefit of symbolic computation. Whether it’s the efficient development of complex physical models using MapleSim, or exploration of parametric design surface equations (my dissertation) using good old fashioned Maple V Release 2, the punch that symbolic computation provided was to automate the algebraic mechanics...

I've never been to Ireland, but this was the first thing that popped into my head when I heard of "mathematical tourism":

As the story goes (recounted here among other places), on October 16, 1843, the Irish mathematician William Rowan Hamilton was walking along the Royal Canal in Dublin with his wife, when he invented the basic relation defining the quaternions. (He had previously been thinking about ways of extending the complex numbers to higher dimensions.) Supposedly, he was so excited by this that he carved i=j=k=ijk=-1 into nearby Brougham Bridge, which must have been one of the most spectacularly opaque pieces of graffiti in history. Unfortunately, there is no trace of such a carving now, but there is a plaque commemorating Hamilton's idea.

William Rowan Hamilton Plaque - geograph.org.uk - 347941

Licence: JP [CC-BY-SA-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

According to the article, since 1989 mathematicians from the National University of Ireland, Maynooth have organized a pilgrimage from Dunsink Observatory to the bridge on the anniversary of Hamilton's discovery. So if you're ever in Dublin in October, you assuredly have someplace to go.

(But be sure not to commute there! :))

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