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Aujourd’hui, je suis ravis d’annoncer la disponibilité d’une large banque de questions françaises supportant les enseignements du secondaire et de l’enseignement supérieur. Ce contenu didactique est disponible via le MapleTA Cloud, et également grâce au lien de téléchargement ci-dessous.

Lien de téléchargement de la banque de questions françaises

Ces questions sont librement et gratuitement accessibles, et vous pouvez les utiliser directement sur vos propres évaluations et exercices dans MapleTA, ou les éditer et modifier pour les adapter à vos besoins.

Le contenu de cette banque de questions françaises traite de sujets pour les classes et enseignements pré-bac, post-bac pour en majorité les matières scientifiques.

Les matières traitées par niveaux et domaines sont:

Lycées :

  • Electricité
  • Équations Différentielles
  • Gravitation universelle
  • Langues
  • Maths I
  • Maths II
  • Physique
  • Chimie
  • Mécanique

Enseignement supérieur (Post-Bac) :

  • Astrobiologie
  • Introduction au Calcul pour la Biologie
  • Chimie
  • Déplacement d'onde
  • Electricité & Magnétisme
  • Maths pour l’économie
  • Maths Post-Bac
  • Mécanique Angulaire
  • Mécanique des Fluides
  • Mécanique linéaire
  • Physique Post-Bac
  • Electrocinétique
  • Matériau
  • Mécanique des Fluides
  • Thermodynamique

Jonny Zivku
Maplesoft Product Manager, Maple T.A.

Several Maple T.A. users have developed comprehensive sets of question content and assignments to support full courses in Maple T.A. These questions are available through the Maple T.A. Cloud, and we have decided to also post the associated course modules on Maple Primes as an alternative way of accessing this content.

Below you will find a link to the Introductory Calculus Maple T.A.. course module developed by Keele University.

This testing content is freely distributed, and can be used in your own Maple T.A. tests either as-is, or with edits.

These questions are designed to accompany the first semester of an introductory honours calculus course. The course is intended primarily for students who need or expect to pursue further studies in mathematics, physics, chemistry, engineering and computer science. With over 250 question, topics include: basic material about functions, polynomials, logs and exponentials, the concept of the derivative, and lots of practise exercises for finding derivatives and integrals, and material about series.

Jonny Zivku
Maplesoft Product Manager, Maple T.A.

Several Maple T.A. users have developed comprehensive sets of question content and assignments to support full courses in Maple T.A. These questions are available through the Maple T.A. Cloud, and we have decided to also post the associated course modules on Maple Primes as an alternative way of accessing this content.

Below you will find a link to the Introductory Calculus for Biological Sciences Maple T.A.. course module developed by the University of Guelph.

This testing content is freely distributed, and can be used in your own Maple T.A. tests either as-is, or with edits.

The Introductory Calculus for Biological Sciences course module is designed to cover a single-semester introductory calculus course for biological sciences students at the first-year university level. The questions are designed to span the topics listed below, allowing for practice, homework or testing throughout the semester.

Topics include:

  • Introduction to Functions
  • Composite and Inverse Functions
  • Trigonometric Functions
  • Logarithms and Exponents
  • Sequences and Finite Series
  • Limits and Continuity
  • Derivatives
  • Curve Sketching
  • Differentials
  • Linear Approximation
  • Taylor Polynomials
  • Difference Equations
  • Log-Log Graphs
  • Anti-Differentiation
  • Definite Integrals

Jonny Zivku
Maplesoft Product Manager, Maple T.A.

Several Maple T.A. users have developed comprehensive sets of question content and assignments to support full courses in Maple T.A. These questions are available through the Maple T.A. Cloud, and we have decided to also post the associated course modules on Maple Primes as an alternative way of accessing this content.

Below you will find a link to the Introductory Mathematical Economics Maple T.A.. course module developed by the University of Guelph.

This testing content is freely distributed, and can be used in your own Maple T.A. tests either as-is, or with edits.

The Introductory Mathematical Economics course module is designed to cover a single-semester course in mathematical economics for economics and commerce students at the second-year university level. The questions are designed to span the topics listed below, allowing for practice, homework or testing throughout the semester.

Topics include:

  • Rules of Differentiation
  • First Order Differential Equations
  • Higher Order Derivatives
  • Optimization in One Variable
  • Second Order Conditions for Optimization
  • Systems of Linear Equations
  • Optimization with Direct Restrictions on Variables
  • Over Determined and Under Determined Systems
  • Matrix Representation of Systems
  • Gauss Jordan
  • Matrix Operations
  • Types of Matrices
  • Determinants and Inverses
  • Partial Differentiation
  • Second Order Partial Derivatives
  • Multivariate Optimization
  • Second Order Conditions for Multivariate Optimization
  • Multivariate Optimization with Direct Restrictions of Variables
  • Constrained Optimization and the Lagrangean Method
  • Second Order Conditions for Constrained Optimization

Jonny Zivku
Maplesoft Product Manager, Maple T.A.

Several Maple T.A. users have developed comprehensive sets of question content and assignments to support full courses in Maple T.A. These questions are available through the Maple T.A. Cloud, and we have decided to also post the associated course modules on Maple Primes as an alternative way of accessing this content.

Below you will find a link to the Introductory Electricity & Magnetism Maple T.A.. course module developed by the University of Guelph.

This testing content is freely distributed, and can be used in your own Maple T.A. tests either as-is, or with edits.

The Introductory Electricity & Magnetism course module is designed to cover a single-semester course in electricity and magnetism for physical sciences students at the first-year university level. The questions are designed to span the topics listed below, allowing for practice, homework or testing throughout the semester. Using the Maple engine that is part of Maple TA, a custom grading engine has been developed to provide even more flexible grading of scalar and vector responses. This partial grading engine can be configured to, among other things, assign part marks for missing units, transposed or missing vector components or missing algebraic terms.


Topics include:

  • Cross Products
  • Coulomb’s Law
  • Electric Fields
  • Point Charge Distributions
  • Continuous Charge Distributions (Integration)
  • Electric Potential
  • Electric Potential Energy
  • Electromotive Force
  • Resistance
  • Capacitance
  • Kirchhoff’s Laws
  • Magnetic Fields
  • Magnetic Fields Due to Current Carrying Wires
  • Forces on Wires in Magnetic Fields
  • Forces on Charges in Electric and/or Magnetic Fields
  • EM Waves
  • Two Source Interference
  • Double Slit Interference
  • Single Slit Diffraction
  • Diffraction Gratings

Jonny Zivku
Maplesoft Product Manager, Maple T.A.

Several Maple T.A. users have developed comprehensive sets of question content and assignments to support full courses in Maple T.A. These questions are available through the Maple T.A. Cloud, and we have decided to also post the associated course modules on Maple Primes as an alternative way of accessing this content.

Below you will find a link to the Statistics Maple T.A.. course module developed by the University of Guelph.

This testing content is freely distributed, and can be used in your own Maple T.A. tests either as-is, or with edits.

The Statistics course module is designed to cover a single-semester course in statistics for science students at the second-year university level. The questions are designed to span the topics listed below, allowing for practice, homework or testing throughout the semester. The questions are mainly of an applied nature and do not delve very deeply into the underlying mathematical theory.

Topics:

  • Introduction to Statistics
  • Descriptive Statistics
  • Basic Probability
  • Discrete Random Variables
  • Continuous Random Variables
  • Sampling Distributions
  • Inference for Means
  • Inference for Proportions
  • Inference for Variances
  • Chi-square Tests for Count Data
  • One-Way ANOVA
  • Simple Linear Regression and Correlation

Jonny Zivku
Maplesoft Product Manager, Maple T.A.

Several Maple T.A. users have developed comprehensive sets of question content and assignments to support full courses in Maple T.A. These questions are available through the Maple T.A. Cloud, and we have decided to also post the associated course modules on Maple Primes as an alternative way of accessing this content.

Below you will find a link to the Statistics Maple T.A.. course module developed by the University of Waterloo.

This testing content is freely distributed, and can be used in your own Maple T.A. tests either as-is, or with edits.

The Statistics content is used in introductory statistics courses at the University of Waterloo, and has been used regularly over several years. The over 700 questions are clearly organized by topic, and provide extensive feedback to students.


Topics include:

  • Basics
  • Confidence Intervals
  • Continuous Distribution
  • Discrete Multivariate
  • Discrete Probability
  • Graphical Analysis
  • Hypothesis Testing
  • Numerical Analysis for Statistics
  • Probability
  • Sampling Distributions

Jonny Zivku
Maplesoft Product Manager, Maple T.A.

Several Maple T.A. users have developed comprehensive sets of question content and assignments to support full courses in Maple T.A. These questions are available through the Maple T.A. Cloud, and we have decided to also post the associated course modules on Maple Primes as an alternative way of accessing this content.

Below you will find a link to the Calculus 1 Maple T.A.. course module developed by the University of Guelph. This course material also forms part of Teaching Calculus with Maple: A Complete Kit, which provides lectures notes, Maple demonstrations, Maple T.A. assignments, and more for teaching both Calculus 1 and Calculus 2.

This testing content is freely distributed, and can be used in your own Maple T.A. tests either as-is, or with edits.

The Calculus 1 course module is designed to accompany the first semester of an introductory honours calculus course. The course is intended primarily for students who need or expect to pursue further studies in mathematics, physics, chemistry, engineering and computer science.

Topics include:

  • trigonometry including the compound angle formulas
  • inequalities and absolute values
  • limits and continuity using rigorous definitions, the derivative and various applications (extreme, related rates, graph sketching)
  • Rolle's Theorem and the Mean Value Theorem for derivatives
  • the differential and anti-differentiation
  • the definite integral with application to area problems
  • the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus
  • logarithmic and exponential functions
  • the Mean Value Theorem for Integrals

The Calculus 2 course module is designed to accompany the second semester of an introductory honours calculus course.

Topics include:

  • inverse trigonometric functions
  • hyperbolic functions
  • L'Hôpital's Rule
  • techniques of integration
  • parametric equations
  • polar coordinates
  • Taylor and MacLaurin series
  • functions or two or more variables
  • partial derivatives
  • multiple integration

Jonny Zivku
Maplesoft Product Manager, Maple T.A.

Announcing the 2014 Maple T.A. User Summit

Maplesoft will be hosting the 2014 Maple T.A. User Summit this October 22-24 in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. This conference discusses important trends in education, how technology is changing, and what all this means for educators and students. This is an opportunity for Maple T.A. users to learn first-hand how Maple T.A. is transforming testing and assessment, and non-users can also benefit by learning about current and future trends in online education.

Conference highlights include:

  • Expert advice from long term users on how they’re using Maple T.A.
  • Comprehensive hands-on Maple T.A. training
  • Demonstration of new features in Maple T.A., and where the technology is heading
  • Social events with Maplesoft staff and other educators from around the world

We invite users who are using Maple T.A. in an innovative way in their classroom to submit a presentation proposal by July 15th, 2014. For details, please visit: https://webstore.maplesoft.com/taconference/MapleTA_Summit_CFP.pdf

For more details, preliminary agenda, and to register, please visit our website: https://webstore.maplesoft.com/taconference/  

Jonny
Maplesoft Product Manager, Maple T.A.

I think we all know the routine. We walk to a large classroom, we sit down for a test, we receive a large stack of questions stapled together and then we fill in tiny bubbles on a separate sheet that is automatically graded by a scanning machine. We’ve all been there. I was thinking recently about how far the humble multiple choice question has come over the last few years with the advent of systems like Maple T.A., and so I did a little research.

Multiple choice questions were first widely-distributed during World War I to test the intelligence of recruits in the United States of America. The army desired a more efficient way of testing as using written and oral evaluations was very time consuming. Dr. Robert Yerkes, the psychologist who convinced the army to try a multiple choice test, wanted to convince people that psychiatry could be a scientific study and not just philosophical. A few years later, SATs began including multiple choice questions. Since then, educational institutions have adopted multiple choice questions as a permanent tool for many different types of assessments.

One of the biggest advances in the use of multiple choice questions was the birth of automatic grading through the use of machine-readable papers. These grew in popularity during the mid-70s as teachers and instructors saved time by not having to grade answer sheets manually.

Until recently, there has not been much advancement in this area.  It’s true, Maple T.A. can do so much more than just multiple choice questions, so this style of question is less important in large-scale testing than it used to be. But multiple choice questions still have their place in an automated testing system, where uses include leveraging older content, easily detecting patterns of misunderstanding, requiring students to choose from different images, and minimizing student interaction with the system. Luckily, Maple T.A. takes even the humble multiple choice questions to the next level. Now you might be thinking, how is that even possible given the basic structure of multiple choice questions? What could possibly be done to enhance them?

Well, for starters, in Maple T.A., you can permute the answers. This means you have the option to change the order of the choices for each student. This is also possible with machine-readable papers, but this does require multiple solution sets for a teacher or instructor to keep track of. With Maple T.A., everything is done for you. For example, if you have a multiple choice question in Maple T.A. with 5 answer choices, there are 120 different possible answer orders that students can be presented with. You don’t have to keep track of extra solution sets or note which test version each student is receiving. Maple T.A. takes care of it all.

Maple T.A. allows you to create Algorithmic questions - multiple choice questions in which you can vary different values in your question. And you aren’t limited to selecting values from a specific range, either. For example, you can select a random integer from a pre-defined list, a random number that satisfies a mathematical condition, such as ‘divisible by 3’ or ‘prime’, or even a random polynomial or matrix with specific characteristics. It allows an instructor to create a single question template, but have tens, hundreds, or even thousands of possible question outcomes based on the randomly selected values for the algorithmic variables. The algorithmic variables not only apply to the question being asked by a student, but also the choices they see in a multiple choice question.

You can even create a question where every student gets the same fixed list of choices, but the question varies to ensure that the correct response changes.  That’s going to confuse some students who are doing a little more “collaboration” than is appropriate!

Some of the other advantages of using Maple T.A. for multiple choice are also common to all Maple T.A. question types. For example, you can provide instant, customized feedback to your students. If a student gets a multiple choice question correct, you can provide feedback showing the solution (who is to say the student didn’t guess and get this question correct?) If a student gets a multiple choice question incorrect, you can provide targeted feedback that depends on which response they chose. This allows you to customize exactly what a student sees in regards to feedback without having to write it out by hand each time.

And of course, like in other Maple T.A. questions, multiple choice questions can include mathematical expressions, plots, images, audio clips, videos, and more – in the questions and in the responses.      

Finally, let’s not forget, in an online testing environment, there is no panic when you realized you accidently skipped line 2 while filling out your card, no risk of paper cuts, and no worrying about what kind of pencil to use!

References:

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/dark-history-of-multiple-choice-ainissa-ramirez

http://xkcd.com/499/

http://io9.com/5908833/the-birth-of-scantrons-the-bane-of-standardized-testing

Maplesoft is holding its first ever Virtual User Summit on Feb. 27.  You’ll be able to watch presentations by both Maplesoft and Maplesoft customers, ask questions, have discussions in the lounge with other attendees, and even enter a draw, all from the comfort of your own home or office.

Here’s the agenda.  We’ll release more detailed information on speakers and session times in the next couple of weeks.

For more information and to register:  Maplesoft Virtual User Conference

We're looking forward to seeing you there. (Well, "seeing you" :-))

eithne

Hello!

If I wirite in an algorithm in MapleTA 9.5 the number 0, and later use it (for export to latex), it becomes negative, but not if I pass through Maple:

 

$null=0;
$zero=maple("0");
$nullstring="$null";
$zerostring="$zero";

results in:

null 0
zero 0
nullstring -0
zerostring 0

 

Why, and what can be done without passing through Maple?

 

Best,

Jan

Congratulations to Eric Miles, a graduate teaching assistant at Colorado State University, for winning the second individual prize of The Möbius App Challenge! Eric will be receiving an iPad prize pack for his app Stretch and Translate Sin(x).

Maplesoft launched the Möbius App Challenge earlier this year to give Maplesoft community members the opportunity to get involved in the creation of Möbius Apps. This contest seeks to challenge users to create Math Apps using Maple, submit them to The Möbius Project website, then award the most useful, creative, and effective submissions. Finalists from the individual level challenge are chosen four times a year, so make sure to enter the next round of the challenge for your chance at a Maplesoft prize pack!

For full contest details and to enter, please visit: http://www.maplesoft.com/lp/mobius/index.aspx.

Jonny Zivku
Maplesoft Product Manager, Maple T.A.

Hi there,

How can I get gridlines in my plots in Maple TA? Se eg. the source of the following question:

Thanks alot in advance!

mode=Multiple Choice@
name=Grafen for den afledede@
comment=@
editing=useHTML@
solution=@
algorithm=$r = rint(3);
$f1 = rint(3);
$f2 = rint(3);
condition: ne($r,$f1);
condition: ne($r,$f2);
condition: ne($f1,$f2);
$rf = switch($r,x^2,cos(x),x);
$ff1 = switch($f1,x^2,cos(x),x);
$ff2 = switch($f2,x^2,cos(x),x);
$fm = mathml("$rf");
$opgaveplot = plotmaple("plot($rf,x=-10..10), plotdevice='gif', plotoptions='height=250,
width=250'");
$rplot=plotmaple("plot(diff($rf,x),x=-10..10), plotdevice='gif', plotoptions='height=250,
width=250'");
$fplot1=plotmaple("plot(diff($ff1,x),x=-10..10), plotdevice='gif', plotoptions='height=250,
width=250'");
$fplot2=plotmaple("plot(diff($ff2,x),x=-10..10), plotdevice='gif', plotoptions='height=250,
width=250'");@
uid=61d45fb9-b1cc-4e0b-a986-9bbb24985734@
privacy=10@
allowRepublish=false@
description=@
difficulty=0.0@
modifiedBy=669aa1fb-4bde-408c-ae4d-6fa47454164c@
school=d1f34b37-d475-429f-b82f-5a0479c33756@
attributeAuthor=true@
numberOfAttempts=1@
numberOfAttemptsLeft=1@
numberOfTryAnother=0@
numberOfTryAnotherLeft=0@
question=<p>
Betragt funktion f(x) = $fm og dens graf herunder.&nbsp;</p>
<p style="text-align: center; ">
$opgaveplot</p>
<p style="text-align: center; ">
&nbsp;</p>
<p>
Angiv hvilken af følgende figurer repræsenterer grafen for funktionen?</p>
@
answer=1@
choice.1=$rplot@
choice.2=$fplot1@
choice.3=$fplot2@
choice.4=Ingen af dem@
choice.5=Der er flere rigtige@
fixed=@

Hi When Im creating subjects and child subjects you would think it would be kept in alphabetic order. But no. It just becomes one big chaos after refreshing browser. What am I doing wrong? Btw what is the difference between subjects and groups inthe question repository? Thanks in advance, Henry
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