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These are Posts that have been published by acer

A set of three taped video interviews with famous physicist and mathematician Cornelius Lanczos (1893-1974) has been made available online by the University of Manchester.

This is a wish list for the version of Maple after whatever immediate next version is being developed.

It's about three-quarters of a year since Maple 16 came out, and if Maple follows its recent history of annual releases then development of new features of the very next release after 16 would be quite well along, and possibly even nearing completion. But that could mean that this is a good time to discuss wish lists for the version after that -- the version two releases after 16.

There are two interesting threads about definite integration on the usenet group comp.soft-sys.math.maple posted in the past few days.

The first thread is more about the wrong result coming out of Maple's int command when computing via its `MeijerG` method. Motivating examples there include

int(cos(t)/(1+t^k), t=-infinity..infinity);      # for k=10,12,14,...

The poster demonstrates using residues to obtain a terse result.

In the second thread the poster examines the ideas that the solutions involving RootOfs (as returned by the `ftoc` method) may suffer from numerical difficulties during floating-point evaluation and are unnecessarily complicated when re-expressed in terms of more standard functions (ie. allvalues, then simplification...).

For those interested, an existing `contour` method exists within `int`. It is not very strong however. One can examine its source using commands such as,

showstat(`int/definite/contour`);

showstat(`int/definite/contour/def1`);

etc.

See also Methods of contour integration on wikipedia.

Following on from the 3D plots of the Earth globes in comments to an earlier post, here's some hacky code to grab longtitude and latitude.

(nb. This code attempts to send the IP address of your primary DNS to www.geobytes.com so don't run it if you don't want that action.)

if kernelopts(platform)="windows" then
   res:=ssystem("ipconfig /all"): res:=res[2];
   StringTools:-Search("Primary Dns Suffix",res);
   ans:=StringTools:-Split(res[%+36..%+70])[1];
else
   ans:=ssystem("hostname -y"...

Let's see how we can display patterns, or even images, on 3D plot surfaces. Here's a simple example.

The underlying mechanism is the COLOR() component of a POLYGONS(), GRID(), or MESH() piece of a PLOT3D() data structure. (See here, here, and here for some older posts which relate to that.)

The data stored in the MESH() of a 3D plot structure can be a list-of-lists or, more efficient, an Array. The dimensions of that Array are m-by-n-by-3 where m and n are usually the size of the grid of points in the x-y plane (or of points in the two independent parameter spaces). In modern Maple quite a few kinds of 3D plots will produce a GRID() or a MESH() which represent the m-by-n independent data points that can be controlled with the usual grid=[m,n] option.

The plot,color help-page describes how colors may specified (for each x-y point pair to be plotted) using a procedure f(x,y). And that's fine for explicit plots, though there are some subtleties there. What is not documented on that help-page is the possibility of efficiently using an m-by-n-by-3 or an m*n-by-3 datatype=float[8], order=C_order Array of RGB values or am m*n float[8] Vector of hue values to specify the color data. And that's what I've been learning about, by experiment.

A (three-layer, RGB or HSV) color image used by the ImageTools package is also an m-by-n-by-3 Array. And all these Arrays under discussion have m*n*3 entries, and with either some or no manipulation they can be interchanged. I wrote earlier about converting ImageTools image structures to and from 2D density-plots. But there is also an easy way to get a 3D density-plot from an ImageTools image with a single command. That command is ImageTools:-Preview, and it even has a useful options to rescale. The rescaling is often necessary so that the dimensions of the COLOR() Array in the result match the dimensions of the grid in the MESH() Array.

For the first example, producing the banded torus above, we can get the color data directly from a densityplot, without reshaping/manipulating the color Array or using any ImageTools routines. The color data is stored in a m*n Vector of hue values.

But first a quick note: Some plots/plottools commands produce a MESH() with the data in a list-of-lists-of-lists, or a POLYGONS() call on a sequence of listlists (eg. `torus` in Maple 14). For convenience conversion of the data to a 3-dimensional Array may be done. It's handy to use `op` to see the contents of the PLOT3D() structure, but a possible catastrophe if a huge listlist gets printed in the Standard GUI.

restart:
with(ImageTools):with(plots):with(plottools):
N:=128:

d:=densityplot((x,y)->frem((x-2*y),1/2),0..1,0..1,
                      colorstyle=HUE,style=patchnogrid,grid=[N,N]):
#display(d);

c:=indets(d,specfunc(anything,COLOR))[1];

                         /     [ 1 .. 16384 Vector[column] ]\
                         |     [ Data Type: float[8]       ]|
               c := COLOR|HUE, [ Storage: rectangular      ]|
                         \     [ Order: C_order            ]/

T:=display(torus([0,0,0],1,2,grid=[N,N]),
           style=surface,scaling=constrained,axes=none,
           glossiness=0.7,lightmodel=LIGHT3):
#op(T); # Only view the operands in full with Maple 16!

# The following commands both produce the banded torus.

#op(0,T)(MESH(op([1,1..-1],T),c),op([2..-1],T)); # alternate way, M16 only

subsop([1,1]=[op([1,1],T),c][],T);

Most of the examples in this post use the command `op` or `indets` extract or replace the various parts of of the strcutures. Perhaps in future there could be an easy mechanism to pass the COLOR() Array directly to the plotting commands, using their `color` optional parameter.

In the next example we'll use an image file that is bundled with Maple as example data, and we'll use it to cover a sphere. We won't downsize the image, so that it looks sharp and clear (but note that this may make your Standard GUI session act a bit sluggish). Because we're not scaling down the image we must specify a grid=[m,n] size in the plotting command that matches the dimensions of the image. We'll use ImageTools:-Preview as a convenient mechanism to produce both the color Array as well as a 3D densityplot so that we can view the original image. Note that the data portion of the sphere plot structure is an m-by-n-by-3 Array in a MESH() which matches the dimensions of the m-by-n-by-3 Array in the COLOR() portion of the result from ImageTools:-Preview.

restart:
with(ImageTools):with(plots):with(plottools):
im:=Read(cat(kernelopts(mapledir),"/data/images/tree.jpg")):

p:=Preview(im):

op(1,p);

                 /                    [ 235 x 354 2-D  Array ]  
                 |                    [ Data Type: float[8]  ]  
             GRID|0 .. 266, 0 .. 400, [ Storage: rectangular ], 
                 \                    [ Order: C_order       ]  

                    /     [ 235 x 354 x 3 3-D  Array ]\\
                    |     [ Data Type: float[8]      ]||
               COLOR|RGB, [ Storage: rectangular     ]||
                    \     [ Order: C_order           ]//

q:=plot3d(1, x=0..2*Pi, y=0..Pi, coords=spherical, style=surface,
          grid=[235,354]):

display(PLOT3D(MESH(op([1,1],q), op([1,4..-1],p)), op(2..-1,q)),
           orientation=[-120,30,160]);
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