Clare So

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12 years, 6 days
Waterloo, Ontario, Canada

I was a software developer in Math and Research groups in 2007-2012.  I reviewed most of the contributions from Maplesoft's academic research labs.  In addition, I was one of the maintainers of the math library in Maple.  My involvement in Maple started in my undergraduate career when I worked at one of Maplesoft's affiliated academic research labs.

I hold BSc and MSc degrees in Computer Science from The University of Western Ontario, London, Canada.

My public LinkedIn profile: http://ca.linkedin.com/in/claremso

MaplePrimes Activity


These are replies submitted by Clare So

Thanks for starting another interesting series of blog posts.

Could you please include a one or two references of your sparse polynomial arithmetic work in posts if possible?  Some advanced users in the Mapleprimes community may be interested in a formal explanation.

Keep up the good work!

Occasionally I am greeted with the error message "Too many connections" from Mapleprimes.  It is a good thing that this site has many visitors, but this means temporary down time for some others.

I waited for some more interesting discussion on your reply to the "Axiom VS Maple" post, but nothing turned up.

Please see ?ExcelTools,Import for more details.

Please see ?ExcelTools,Import for more details.

Selecting rows of Matrices using A[1] notation works starting Maple 12.

Selecting rows of Matrices using A[1] notation works starting Maple 12.

Just a last remark - The result of LinearAlgebra[Row] and LinearAlgebra[Column] can be converted to a vector using "convert":

> M:=Matrix([[1,2,2],[3,2,0],[4,5,7],[8,3,5]]);
                                   [1    2    2]
                                   [           ]
                                   [3    2    0]
                              M := [           ]
                                   [4    5    7]
                                   [           ]
                                   [8    3    5]

> row:=LinearAlgebra[Row](M,2):
> row:=convert(row,vector);
                               row := [3, 2, 0]

> type(row,vector);
                                     true

> column:=LinearAlgebra[Column](M,2):
> column:=convert(column,vector);
                            column := [2, 2, 5, 3]

> type(column,vector);               
                                     true

Just a last remark - The result of LinearAlgebra[Row] and LinearAlgebra[Column] can be converted to a vector using "convert":

> M:=Matrix([[1,2,2],[3,2,0],[4,5,7],[8,3,5]]);
                                   [1    2    2]
                                   [           ]
                                   [3    2    0]
                              M := [           ]
                                   [4    5    7]
                                   [           ]
                                   [8    3    5]

> row:=LinearAlgebra[Row](M,2):
> row:=convert(row,vector);
                               row := [3, 2, 0]

> type(row,vector);
                                     true

> column:=LinearAlgebra[Column](M,2):
> column:=convert(column,vector);
                            column := [2, 2, 5, 3]

> type(column,vector);               
                                     true

This looks cool.  What did you do to Medit?

This looks cool.  What did you do to Medit?

According to infolevel's help page, the following values are used as the infolevel integer values in the Maple library:

  • Level 1: reserved for information that the user must be told.
  • Level 2,3: general information, including technique or algorithm being used.
  • Level 4,5: more detailed information about how the problem is being solved

According to infolevel's help page, the following values are used as the infolevel integer values in the Maple library:

  • Level 1: reserved for information that the user must be told.
  • Level 2,3: general information, including technique or algorithm being used.
  • Level 4,5: more detailed information about how the problem is being solved

Jacques, the approach you have mentioned in your post is called "user centred design" in HCI (Human Computer Interaction). This design philosophy is well documented and discussed in HCI literature.

(I am another developer who listens to your opinion!)

 

I think that Jacques does not need a *guided* tour of Waterloo Region.   ;-)

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