Schivnorr

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16 years, 81 days

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These are replies submitted by Schivnorr

Actually, specifying "range(realcons)" is a type check, and it may be buried somewhere in the type help page(s); however, I didn't know that I could do it until I tried one day and it worked. Experimentation will never be outdated.
Numeric instability by itself is not at all surprising; however, what we have here seems different. Put the above command lines into Maple and run them. You get the same results as I've posted. Then, remove (comment out) the my_deq assignment and dsolve() lines, and run again. No difference in answers. It seems that the dsolve() and/or the my_deq assignment lines are causing instability elsewhere.
If you adjust your font size, then you should be able to see the entire lines defining the a, b, and c variables. Or, if you just highlight the entire line, you should be able to copy it all and paste it into a Maple worksheet. This is a logistic differential equation with a carrying capacity of .520e12, and yet Maple is returning answers of .522e12. What makes this result striking is how the dsolve() command seems to determine whether Maple will return .52e12 or .522e12.
Is it possible to embed components from Maple? Certainly. First, create a worksheet containing the components you wish to embed in another. Second, save that worksheet and open it in a text editor. Third, study the way in which Maple stores the embedded components in the worksheet. Fourth, use the XMLTools or Worksheet package (or a combination of both, but beware that they don't "talk to one another" very well) to embed similar information into another worksheet. Is this good? Is this convenient? I don't know, but it works (at least, I've made it work).
Is it possible to embed components from Maple? Certainly. First, create a worksheet containing the components you wish to embed in another. Second, save that worksheet and open it in a text editor. Third, study the way in which Maple stores the embedded components in the worksheet. Fourth, use the XMLTools or Worksheet package (or a combination of both, but beware that they don't "talk to one another" very well) to embed similar information into another worksheet. Is this good? Is this convenient? I don't know, but it works (at least, I've made it work).
The Statistics package contains many tools which may be of use to you in summarizing your data, including: FrequencyTable, FrequencyPlot, and Histogram. Statistics:-FrequencyTable(R); Statistics:-FrequencyPlot(R); Statistics:-Histogram(R);
The Statistics package contains many tools which may be of use to you in summarizing your data, including: FrequencyTable, FrequencyPlot, and Histogram. Statistics:-FrequencyTable(R); Statistics:-FrequencyPlot(R); Statistics:-Histogram(R);
I can see why the hardware datatype would cut down on memory allocation, but is there a big difference between storing as a Vector and storing as a list?
I can see why the hardware datatype would cut down on memory allocation, but is there a big difference between storing as a Vector and storing as a list?
Go figure. And here, I've always been told that it's always less efficient to create and then modify (a list) as opposed to create (a list) with the values (and even less efficient to create (a list) and add (to the list) incrementally). But now I have a convenient tool for testing memory use! Thank you, acer.
Go figure. And here, I've always been told that it's always less efficient to create and then modify (a list) as opposed to create (a list) with the values (and even less efficient to create (a list) and add (to the list) incrementally). But now I have a convenient tool for testing memory use! Thank you, acer.
The use of [] after a list to spill the contents of the list in the list help file. ?list 5th example. --Schivnorr
The use of [] after a list to spill the contents of the list in the list help file. ?list 5th example. --Schivnorr
"fi" and "od" are equivalent to "end if" and "end do", respectively. is(t>m) returns a boolean value, whereas t>m is just an expression. Whenever you say "if (something) then" Maple will call evalb() on the something. As I mentioned before, evalb(t>m) has major problems when t or m is of type realcons and not type numeric. evalb() has no troubles with boolean expressions. Jacques was saying that simply using is(t>m) is not recommended because of the behaviour of is().
"fi" and "od" are equivalent to "end if" and "end do", respectively. is(t>m) returns a boolean value, whereas t>m is just an expression. Whenever you say "if (something) then" Maple will call evalb() on the something. As I mentioned before, evalb(t>m) has major problems when t or m is of type realcons and not type numeric. evalb() has no troubles with boolean expressions. Jacques was saying that simply using is(t>m) is not recommended because of the behaviour of is().
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