MaplePrimes Announcement

Time is running out for users of Mathcad® 15 worksheets.
Engineers who need to retain their historical Mathcad project files are faced with a looming deadline to move the content to another file format.

The good news is that Mathcad 15 users can turn to Maple Flow as an effective replacement design calculation tool. Maple Flow is an advanced calculation tool with a free-form layout that makes it easy for engineers to brainstorm, develop, and document their project designs.

Maplesoft now has an efficient migration solution for moving critical Mathcad content to Maple Flow worksheets. This gives engineers a path to safeguard their critical reference designs, mathematical analyses, and engineering test results.

Why are engineers moving from Mathcad 15?
In 2025, some changes are expected that will severely restrict access to Mathcad 15 software. Here’s some background:

  • PTC announced that Mathcad 15 is end-of-sale effective December 2021, restricting license activations for new users.
  • Those existing Mathcad 15 customers who bought multiyear license extensions will see them expire by December 2025. After that, those with subscription licenses will not be able to open the app, and will not be able to access their historic design documents.
  • One of the significant issues engineers are encountering is that the new version of the software is not directly compatible with their historical Mathcad documents. PTC no longer has the right to distribute software versions with a third-party component, and has opted to use a different symbolic calculation engine in Mathcad Prime® that cannot read and edit the legacy files.
  • Another issue is that the Mathcad 15 software does not support Windows 11, so is typically run on Windows 10, a platform that Microsoft will not be supporting after October 2025.
  • Without a reliable way to keep accessing their project work in the Mathcad 15 format, engineers are looking for an alternative design worksheet platform.

As a result, engineers with large repositories of these design files now face converting all the worksheets to a new format or risk losing access to valuable design reports, and the possible regulatory consequences.

Maple Flow as a replacement for Mathcad 15
Engineers who want a long-term stable environment for their critical project work can change their design workflow to use Maple Flow for everyday calculation tasks.

The advanced math features and formatting options in Maple Flow make it a good fit for creating (and updating) design documentation and hand calculations, where engineers combine mathematical equations and variables that change regularly, and show the results in a report.

Maple Flow has a short learning curve, and the range of example templates in the Application Center and the customized training all help users quickly get up to speed with Maple Flow commands and formatting features.

How can I migrate Mathcad 15 content to Maple Flow?
Maplesoft has created a series of migration strategies for users of Mathcad software to transition to Maple Flow for ongoing calculation needs or to meet compliance requirements.

For engineers with a handful of worksheets, or where the calculations only span a few pages, it is relatively quick to reenter the calculations directly in Maple Flow. Some steps will need to be updated to the equivalent Maple Flow function, and there is also the opportunity to use features that are not available in Mathcad 15 (or its successor Mathcad Prime), such as advanced signal processing tools, thermodynamic data, and functionality for the analysis of linear systems.

For engineering firms with large repositories of legacy Mathcad 15 files, Maplesoft has developed a convenient path to migrate batches of content into Maple Flow. Maplesoft Engineering Services guide customers through the migration process and apply an efficient Migration Assistant to move the equations, variable definitions, units, layout, and other supported features from Mathcad 15 worksheets to Maple Flow. The content is mapped to the equivalent Maple Flow functionality, so that calculations can be run and developed further. This allows project worksheets and templates to be recreated with the least investment in time.

This image shows a calculation section before and after batch migration into Maple Flow format:

Ongoing support from Maplesoft

Maple Flow was first launched in 2021 and was developed to give engineers a single tool that can perform mathematical analysis and present results in a professional-looking format. There is built-in support for natural mathematical notation and tracking units, and the development roadmap continues to follow a user-focused approach, so new usability enhancements are regular and relevant.

The current release of Maple Flow gives engineers a path to avoid losing legacy calculations and designs previously stuck in Mathcad 15 worksheets and reuse the content for ongoing project work.

If you would like assistance from Maplesoft with migrating large repositories of design worksheets, please contact Maplesoft Sales.

[This is a contributed article by Alex Beilby, Technical Marketing Mgr, Maplesoft]

Featured Post

February 2nd is Groundhog Day in North America. A day when we look to small marmots to prognosticate the weather. If the groundhog sees its shadow when it emerges from its burrow, then it predicts 6 more weeks of winter, and if not, then spring begins today! Unfortunately there are many official weather predicting groundhogs. Fortunately, the excellent website Groundhog-Day.com tracks each of their predictions. Unfortunately, it doesn't tell you which groundhog to trust. Fortunately, it has an API and we can take the data and map it in Maple:

This map assumes that each groundhog's prediction is valid at it's exact geographic coordinates, but that it's predictive powers fall off in inverse proportion to the distance away.  So, exactly halfway between a groundhog predicting early spring, and one predicting 6 more weeks of winter, we expect 3 more weeks of winter.  I handle that with Maple's Interpolation:-InverseDistanceWeightedInterpolation command with a radius of 1500 miles.  I plot a contourplot of that interpolating function, and then display it with the world map in DataSets:-Builtin:-WorldMap to generate the image above.

All the code to do that can be found in the following worksheet which also using the URL packaget to fetch the most recent groundhog data possible from the website.

Groundhog-Map.mw

I've commented out a few lines that you might use to explore other possible maps.  You can filter to file to just include real living groundhogs and not all the other precitions (some from puppets, some from other animals) if you find that more trust worthy. You might also prefer to change the interpolation command, one of my collegues suggests that Interpolation:-NaturalNeighborInterpolation might be a better choice.

Featured Post

The Lunar New Year is approaching and 2024 is the Year of the Dragon! This inspired me to create a visualization approximating the dragon curve in Maple Learn, using Maple. 

The dragon curve, first described by physicist John Heighway, is a fractal that can be constructed by starting with a single edge and then continually performing the following iteration process:  

Starting at one endpoint of the curve, traverse the curve and build right triangles on alternating sides of each edge on the curve. Then, remove all the original edges to obtain the next iteration. 

visual of dragon curve iteration procedure 

This process continues indefinitely, so while we can’t draw the fractal perfectly, we can approximate it using a Lindenmayer system. In fact, Maple can do all the heavy lifting with the tools found in the Fractals package, which includes the LSystem subpackage to build your own Lindenmayer systems. The subpackage also contains different examples of fractals, including the dragon curve. Check out the Maple help pages here: 

Overview of the Fractals Package  

Overview of the Fractals:-LSystem Subpackage 

Using this subpackage, I created a Maple script (link) to generate a Maple Learn document (link) to visualize the earlier iterations of the approximated dragon curve. Here’s what iteration 11 looks like: 

eleventh iteration of dragon curve approximation  

You can also add copies of the dragon curve, displayed at different initial angles, to visualize how they can fit together. Here are four copies of the 13th iteration: 

four copies of the thirteenth iteration of the dragon curve approximation 

 

Mathematics is full of beauty and fractals are no exception. Check out the LSystemExamples subpackage to see many more examples. 

 

Happy Lunar New Year! 

 



Incorrect `limit`?

Maple 2023 asked by sursumCord... 867 February 18

How to find the normalization factor ?

Maple asked by Dkunb 45 February 17