Daniel Skoog

Daniel Skoog

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8 years, 262 days
Maplesoft
Maple Product Manager

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Daniel Skoog is a Product Manager for Maplesoft. He holds a B.Sc. in Mathematics from Queen’s University, Canada and a M.Sc. in Financial Mathematics from Uppsala University, Sweden. Daniel joined Maplesoft in 2011 and has used his applied technical expertise of mathematics, statistics, data analysis and software design to deliver several exciting new releases. Daniel has also contributed several commands to the Maple library, having authored new routines in Statistics, Finance and data analysis.

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These are Posts that have been published by Daniel Skoog

Here are some tips and tricks that will help you get the most out of Maple 2015, covering from short cuts to how to use the newest features.

    1. Whenever you are asking yourself “..but how do I do it?”, just type ?Portal+Enter, and you will access the Maple Portal, which will give you a complete guide on how to do things.

    2. If you want to implement 1 of the 300 tasks that Maple offers in a syntax-free way, like Completing the Square, just follow this path: Tools≻Tasks≻Browse.

    3. Type Ctrl+F2 or Command+F2 and the Quick Reference window with shortcut keys and other information about working with the Maple interface will pop up.

    4. If you need quick help with a specific mathematical function, click or highlight the function + F2 and a Help box that contains a summary of the basic characteristics of the function will pop up.

    5. If you have installed the Excel Add-in and you want to perform some Maple commands within Excel, make sure to enable the Maple add in by following this path: Excel’s Tool Menu>Add-Ins>Select Maple Excel Add-in Box> OK

    6. Export Maple’s data into Excel by right clicking and choosing ‘Export As’>Excel.

    7. Instead of having to copy-paste your Maple information into a Power Point Presentation, just turn the slideshow mode on by pressing F11. This way you will have an interactive presentation that holds all the live plots and embedded components that Maple offers.

    8. Whenever you want to create interactive mini-applications that can be used to explore the parameters of any arbitrary Maple expression, such as a plot, mathematical equation, or command use the Exploration Assistant. Do this by either right-clicking +Explore from the context-sensitive menus, or by calling the Explore command.

    9. Save time while computing mathematical expressions by calling the equation label instead of having to re-type the equation. Do this by pressing CTRL+L and then input the number that identifies the equation.

    10. Reference mathematical equations or expressions from other documents. First, determine which label is associated with the equation you want. In the main document, select "Insert" > "Reference". From the file dialog, select the file containing the expression. Then select the equation reference number of your equation from the list that appears.

    11. In Maple, the letter "e" entered using the keyboard does not represent the exponential function. The exponential function can be entered using command completion (Ctrl+Space or ESC) or the "exp(a)" item in the Expression Palette (Standard interface only). The exponential can also be entered as:          
      > exp(x)

    12. With Maple 2015 you can now access data sets from various built-in and online data sources. This package is able to access time series data from the data aggregator Quandl, as well as locally installed data from countries and cities. To learn more, click here.

    13. Whenever you assign plots to a variable name, p:=[plot(sin(x)), plot(cos(x))] a thumbnail of the plot will appear instead of the code.

    14. Save time when inputting existing or personalized units. Just click CTRL+SHIFT+U and type the desired units you want.

    15. With Maple 2015 you can now zoom in or out just by pressing CTRL+SCROLL or CTRL+ place two fingers on the pad and move them up to zoom in or down to zoom out.

    16. Convert a Maple Worksheet into Microsoft Word: This can be done using the Export to HTML feature.
      1. Prepare your worksheet as you would like it to appear in the document.
      2. From the "File" menu in Maple, select "Export As ..." > "HTML".
      3. Give the HTML file a name, "output.html" for example.
      4. When the export has completed, start Word, and open the HTML file. If you used "output.html" as the name to save the file as, open the file called "output1.html" into Word.
      5. From the "File" menu in Word, select "Save as Word Document" to save the file. You now have a Word document which contains the content of your Maple worksheet.

        Note: this procedure will work with any Word Processing program that can open an HTML document.

    17. Change Maple’s default input from 2D to 1D:
      1. Open the Tools > Options... menu (Maple > Preferences on a MACINTOSH machine).
      2. Select the Display tab
      3. From "Input Display" menu select Maple Notation
      4. Press the Apply to Session button to make the change take effect for the current Maple session.
      5. Press Apply Globally to have the change take effect permanently. Maple will need to be restarted if you choose Apply Globally for the changes to take effect.

        You may download a set of instruction on how to change your 2D interface to the “Classic” Style here: ftp://public.maplesoft.com/miscellaneous/ChangeToClassicInterface.pdf

We hope that you find this list helpful. Please feel free to add any of your tips or techniques to this post, or to create your own new topic.

Following @acer 's challenge to create some more examples for the Rosetta Code project, I've put together some code that constructs Stem-And-Leaf plots here.

I've also attached a new mathapp ( StemAndLeafDisplay.mw ) that contains the code as well as an interactive example for Stem-Plots. This MathApp is also viewable online on the MapleCloud here.

This older post may also be of interest for anyone looking to make a stem and leaf plot with decimals.

In Maple 18, the Database package has been updated to include support for SQlite databases as well as a new option for plots to change the background images on plots.  To showcase both of these features, our engineering team put together an example that optimizes the flight path of a pan-US delivery drone.

This application extracts the latitude and longitude of those zip codes from an SQLlite database (the application includes the database, which cross-references US zip codes against their latitude, longitude, city and state). The application then performs a traveling salesman optimization and plots the shortest path on a map of the US.

To download the application click here: PanUSDeliveryDro.zip

We conduct regular reviews of our platform support to ensure that we are focusing on the platforms that are most valued by our customers. Based on our most recent review, we will offer the next release of Maple on the platforms listed below. As additional versions of operating systems on these platforms are announced, we will take those into account as well.

Supported Platforms and Operating Systems
Windows
Windows XP
Windows Vista
Windows 7
Windows Server 2008 R2
Windows Server 2012
Windows 8

Linux
Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6
SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop 11
Ubuntu 12.04 LTS
Ubuntu 13.10 (Planned)

Mac
OS X 10.7
OS X 10.8

Discontinued
Mac OS X 10.6
Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 update 5
Ubuntu 12.10
Oracle Solaris 10 (the next release of Maple will not be available on Solaris)

If you have any questions or concerns, please don’t hesitate to reply to this topic, or contact us directly at: maplepm (at) maplesoft.com

Using the Quandl API, we have created a Quandl library for Maple.  The Quandl library for Maple provides easy access to Quandl’s repository of over 5 million time-series datasets from directly inside Maple, allowing you to utilize Maple’s robust tools for mathematical statistics and data analysis on Quandl’s extensive collection of data.  This library features a similar set of functionalities to the Quandl

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