gkokovidis

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16 years, 137 days
Draeger Medical Systems, Inc.

 

 

Regards,
Georgios Kokovidis
Dräger Medical

MaplePrimes Activity


These are answers submitted by gkokovidis

To mirror a function about an axis, you can use the ?reflect command, which is part of the plottools package.

Regards,

Georgios

Try evaluating before using the plot command.

eq:=eval ((6), {n=10, m=1});

plot(eq,k=0.1..0.2);

 

Regards,

Georgios

restart:

eq1:=((alpha[2]-alpha[1]*lambda)*x^(1/2)+p[1]*lambda)*(k[2]*(1-lambda^2)+2) = p[2]*(2*k[2]*(1-lambda^2)+2);

eq1 := ((alpha[2]-alpha[1]*lambda)*x^(1/2)+p[1]*lambda)*(k[2]*(1-lambda^2)+2) = p[2]*(2*k[2]*(1-lambda^2)+2)

(1)

eq2:=((alpha[2]-alpha[1]*lambda)*sqrt(x)+p[1]*lambda)*(k[2]*(1-lambda^2)+2) = p[2]*(2*k[2]*(1- lambda^2)+2);

eq2 := ((alpha[2]-alpha[1]*lambda)*x^(1/2)+p[1]*lambda)*(k[2]*(1-lambda^2)+2) = p[2]*(2*k[2]*(1-lambda^2)+2)

(2)

solve({eq1,eq2},{p[1],p[2]});

{p[2] = p[2], p[1] = -(-x^(1/2)*alpha[2]*k[2]+x^(1/2)*alpha[2]*k[2]*lambda^2-2*x^(1/2)*alpha[2]+x^(1/2)*alpha[1]*lambda*k[2]-x^(1/2)*alpha[1]*lambda^3*k[2]+2*x^(1/2)*alpha[1]*lambda+2*p[2]*k[2]-2*p[2]*k[2]*lambda^2+2*p[2])/(lambda*(-k[2]+k[2]*lambda^2-2))}

(3)

 

Download solve.mws

 

Regards,

Georgios Kokovidis

Dräger Medical

Try the line below, and see if it meets your requirements.  Another way to plot multiple functions on one graph is to use the display command.  ?display for more help.

 

plot([exp(x),exp(x)+3,exp(x)*2,exp(x+3)],x=0..1,color=[blue,red,green,brown]);

 

Regards,

Georgios

Here is one way, if I understand your question correctly.

restart:

f:=x->x^2;

proc (x) options operator, arrow; x^2 end proc

(1)

plot({f(x),f(x-2),f(x-4)},x=-4..8,y=0..12,color=[green,blue,red]);

 

plot({f(x-2)+2,f(x-4)+2},x=-4..8,y=0..12,color=[blue,red]);

 

 

Download translate.mw

Regards,

Georgios

My mistake, I missed that part.  Thanks for pointing it out.

restart: with(Bits);
nums := [10, 3, 90, 6];
                         [10, 3, 90, 6]
ans :=Split~(nums);
    [[0, 1, 0, 1], [1, 1], [0, 1, 0, 1, 1, 0, 1], [0, 1, 1]]

Notice in the code provided by Carl Love the command Bits, followed by :-

From the help pages: 

 

Module Members

 
  

When the underlying implementation of a package is a module, it is also possible to use the form PackageName:-command to access a command from the package.  Since the ":-" notation never evaluates its right-hand side, it is never necessary to use unevaluation quotes in this form. This notation is recommended for accessing PackageName commands from within any program you might write so that it executes as you expect in all contexts. For more information, see module.

You can do this at the beginning of your worksheet.

with(Bits):

then your code

> nums := [10, 3, 90, 6];
> Bits := Split(nums);

will work.

Examples:

restart:

convert(10,binary);

1010

                           (1)

convert(3,binary);

11

                                (2)

convert(90,binary);

1011010

                   (3)

convert(6,binary);

110

                            (4)

nums:=[10,3,90,6];

[10, 3, 90, 6]

                                               (5)

seq(convert(nums[i],binary),i=1..nops(nums));

1010, 11, 1011010, 110

                                          (6)

 

Download binary.mw

Regards,

Georgios

Start by looking at the help file for MmaTranslator[FromMmaNotebook]

At the Maple prompt, enter the following, and hit the enter key:

?MmaTranslator[FromMmaNotebook];

If you are still struggling, upload your MMA Notebook using the green up arrow key.

 

Regards,

Georgios

Part a) is the dsolve command.

Part b) is the phaseportrait, using the dfieldplot command.

Parc c), I left to you to complete, by looking at the help file for ?DEtools, and under that, using the phaseportrait command on

 

ode1:=diff(y(x),x)=2*x^2+0.8*y(x)^3-1.2*x*y(x);

Regards,

Georgios

For help in solving differential equations in Maple, start with the help command for ?dsolve

Below is an example worksheet to get you started.  See the help pages and associated examples within for ?DEtools and all of the sub-commands that are supported with this package.

restart:with(DEtools):

ode1:=diff(y(x),x)=2*x^2+0.8*y(x)^3-1.2*x*y(x);

diff(y(x), x) = 2*x^2+.8*y(x)^3-1.2*x*y(x)

(1)

dsolve(ode1);

dfieldplot(ode1,[y],x=-3..3,y=-3..3);

 

?DEtools

 

Download detools.mw

Regards,

Georgios

Hello.  I didn't try to evaluate what you posted, but at first glance, what is (e)^(...  Are you using the 2D input, or 1D.  If you are using 1D, then you need to use exp() instead of e^ for the exponential function.

If that is not the heart of the problem, then can you upload your worksheet, so we can execute it as is without cutting and pasting the above code?

Regards,

Georgios

Look at the Tools menu, and select Tutors, Calculus-Single Variable, Curve Analysis

You can enter your function there, and click on different options, like Max, Min, Zeros..., by clicking on the buttons.

 

Regards,

Georgios

You can also use Roots from the Student[Calculus1] package. It uses fsolve under the hood.


restart:with(Student[Calculus1]):

Roots(tan(sqrt(lambda)) = sqrt(lambda), 0..1000 , numeric );

          [20.19072856, 59.67951594, 118.8998692, 197.8578112, 296.5544121, 414.9899843,

  553.1646458, 711.0784497, 888.7314225]

Download Roots.mw

 

Regards,

Georgios

Here is another way, similar to the above, without the use of single quotes.  It is a little bit faster for larger ranges of 'x'.

restart:

plot(int(exp(-x^2),x),x=-4..4);

 

 

 

Download int_plot.mw

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