Tim Vrablik

629 Reputation

13 Badges

13 years, 244 days

I work in Maplesoft’s Applications group. This group is a hub between Sales/Marketing and R&D. I primarily work with customers to help them use our software for their projects.

Born and raised in Windsor, Ontario, I spent a substantial chunk of my life there. I attended the University of Windsor to study Engineering and Math, and moved to Waterloo to start working with Maplesoft.

My first introduction to Maple was in a differential equations class. Our professor swore by it every day, and felt obliged to show us examples on how to use it at the end of every class. Admittedly, I usually skipped out of class right around that point. It wasn’t until I sat down and used the software to do my homework that I truly realized how useful Maple was…I only wish I had heeded my professor’s advice in the first month of the semester instead of the last.

MaplePrimes Activity


These are replies submitted by Tim Vrablik

View is an option in the plot command.  In order to use these options, you still have to enter in the original command correctly.  For plot, that means you have to enter something like plot(f,x) or plot(f, x=x0..x1), so that's why you need the x=0..5 part.

I'm not sure how many points you are expecting, but you have 4 elements in your list.  One possible solution would be to have i=1..npile-1.  This will get you 3 sets lengths instead of 4.

I'm not sure how many points you are expecting, but you have 4 elements in your list.  One possible solution would be to have i=1..npile-1.  This will get you 3 sets lengths instead of 4.

Your best bet might be to contact Technical Support.

I don't think anything was cut off.  He is simply telling you to look at the command algsubs.

I don't think anything was cut off.  He is simply telling you to look at the command algsubs.

I'm sure there are other ways, but you could do a simple for loop

for i from 1 to n^2 do;

solve(eqs[i]);

end do;

I'm sure there are other ways, but you could do a simple for loop

for i from 1 to n^2 do;

solve(eqs[i]);

end do;

In Maple 13, you can attach units to your 2D/3D plots rather easily.

plot3d(sin(x)+cos(y), x = -5 .. 5, y = -5 .. 5, axes = framed, useunits = [Unit('rad'), Unit('rad'), Unit('m')])

You can also just use labels just like in 2D plots as well.

As for getting kg/m^2 to be displayed all in one line on the plot...I'm not sure if that can be done.  You can get it displayed in 1D by typing in "kg\/m^2."

 

In Maple 13, you can attach units to your 2D/3D plots rather easily.

plot3d(sin(x)+cos(y), x = -5 .. 5, y = -5 .. 5, axes = framed, useunits = [Unit('rad'), Unit('rad'), Unit('m')])

You can also just use labels just like in 2D plots as well.

As for getting kg/m^2 to be displayed all in one line on the plot...I'm not sure if that can be done.  You can get it displayed in 1D by typing in "kg\/m^2."

 

Hmm...well, I took the question as to how do you remove the brackets/parentheses, and if I remove the square brackets, the brackets/parentheses are gone.

plot(x^2, x = 0 .. 5, labels = [x, `°`(theta, C)])

Either way, he should have plenty of options now.

Hmm...well, I took the question as to how do you remove the brackets/parentheses, and if I remove the square brackets, the brackets/parentheses are gone.

plot(x^2, x = 0 .. 5, labels = [x, `°`(theta, C)])

Either way, he should have plenty of options now.

Please do not spam the discussion board by posting the same question multiple times.  This question has already been started in a separate thread.

The simplest answer is usually the correct one...just take off the brackets :)

The simplest answer is usually the correct one...just take off the brackets :)

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