Featured Post

With Maple, you can create amazing visualizations that go far beyond the standard mathematical plots that you might typically expect (I wince every time I see yet another sine curve).

At your fingertips, you have

  • plotting primitives that can be assembled in new and novel ways
  • precise control over coloring (yay for ColorTools) and placement
  • an interactive coding environment with inline plots, giving you quick visual feedback over aesthetic changes
  • and a comprehensive mathematical programming language to glue everything together

Here, I thought I'd share a few of the visualizations I've really enjoyed creating over the last few years (and I'd like to emphasize 'enjoy' - doing this stuff is fun!)

Let me know if you want any of the worksheets.

 

Psychrometric chart with historical weather data for Waterloo, Ontario.

 

Ternary plot of the color of gold-silver-copper alloys

 

Spectrogram of a violin note played with vibrato

 

Colored zoom of the Mandelbrot set

 

Reporting dashboard for an Organic Rankine Cycle

 

Temperature-entropy plot of an ideal Rankine Cycle

 

Quaternion fractal

 

Historical sunpot data

 

Earthquake data

 

African literacy rates

Featured Post

This post is the answer to this question.

The procedure named  IntOverDomain  finds a double integral over an arbitrary domain bounded by a non-selfintersecting piecewise smooth curve. The code of the procedure uses the well-known Green's theorem.

Each section in the border should be specified by a list in the following formats :    
1. If a section is given parametrically, then  [[f(t), g(t)], t=t1..t2]    
2. If several consecutive sections of the border or the entire border is a broken line, then it is sufficient to set vertices of this broken line  [ [x1,y1], [x2,y2], .., [xn,yn] ] (for the entire border should be  [xn,yn]=[x1,y1] ).

Required parameters of the procedure:  f  is an expression in variables  x  and  y , L  is the list of all the sections. The sublists of the list  L  must follow in the positive direction (counterclockwise).

The code of the procedure:

restart;
IntOverDomain := proc(f, L) 
local n, i, j, m, yk, yb, xk, xb, Q, p, P, var;
n:=nops(L);
Q:=int(f,x);  
for i from 1 to n do 
if type(L[i], listlist(algebraic)) then
m:=nops(L[i]);
for j from 1 to m-1 do
yk:=L[i,j+1,2]-L[i,j,2]; yb:=L[i,j,2];
xk:=L[i,j+1,1]-L[i,j,1]; xb:=L[i,j,1];
p[j]:=int(eval(Q*yk,[y=yk*t+yb,x=xk*t+xb]),t=0..1);
od;
P[i]:=add(p[j],j=1..m-1) else
var := lhs(L[i, 2]);
P[i]:=int(eval(Q*diff(L[i,1,2],var),[x=L[i,1,1],y=L[i,1,2]]),L[i,2]) fi;
od; 
add(P[i], i = 1 .. n); 
end proc:

 

Examples of use.

1. In the first example, we integrate over a quadrilateral:

with(plottools): with(plots):
f:=x^2+y^2:
display(polygon([[0,0],[3,0],[0,3],[1,1]], color="LightBlue"));  
# Visualization of the domain of integration
IntOverDomain(x^2+y^2, [[[0,0],[3,0],[0,3],[1,1],[0,0]]]);  # The value of integral

 

2. In the second example, some sections of the boundary of the domain are curved lines:

display(inequal({{y<=sqrt(x),y>=sin(Pi*x/3)/2,y<=3-x}, {y>=-2*x+3,y>=sqrt(x),y<=3-x}}, x=0..3,y=0..3, color="LightGreen", nolines), plot([[t,sqrt(t),t=0..1],[t,-2*t+3,t=0..1],[t,3-t,t=0..3],[t,sin(Pi*t/3)/2,t=0..3]], color=black, thickness=2));
f:=x^2+y^2: L:=[[[t,sin(Pi*t/3)/2],t=0..3],[[3,0],[0,3],[1,1]], [[t,sqrt(t)],t=1..0]]:
IntOverDomain(f, L);

 

3. If  f=1  then the procedure returns the area of the domain:

IntOverDomain(1, L);  # The area of the above domain
evalf(%);

 

IntOverDomain.mw

Edit.



Exponential Fit Problem

Maple 2015 asked by Les 100 Today

InhomogeneousDiophantine

Maple asked by dimpfelmos... 0 Yesterday

modify an expression

Maple 2016 asked by taro 365 July 25

how to solve this system?

Maple 12 asked by asa12 390 Yesterday

Exponential models?

Maple 2015 asked by Les 100 July 25